Visions & Works

Book arts, illustration, drawing, painting, printmaking: Made by Ariana Martinez, a student at Brown University/Rhode Island School of Design (BRDD 2017). Secondary blog: http://curiosityequalswonder.tumblr.com/

Dec 16

RISD painting 1 Final Critique


Dec 13
Figure study, oil on canvas

Figure study, oil on canvas


Image transfer and oil on canvas

Image transfer and oil on canvas


Nov 24

Preparatory drawings for a life-size portrait. More to come!


Oct 10

RISD Sophomore painting 1
Assignment: The Wrecking Ball: make a painting and radically alter it at least three times through three different methods.

Title: The Demolition of Penn Station, 1964 
 Medium: Oil and Silkscreen on Canvas, 36”x48”


Aug 22

Sketches for “Vessels”, a series of drawings reflecting upon the associations common domestic objects have with the ideas of discipline, structure, nourishment,comfort, family, and memory.


Aug 19

Matches

Prototype for a miniature book of poems.


Aug 5
For my ongoing project, Let’s Face Facts: an Information Journal. An illustrated definition of gravity and it’s usage in poetry, music, film, and pop culture beyond its scientific basis.

For my ongoing project, Let’s Face Facts: an Information Journal. An illustrated definition of gravity and it’s usage in poetry, music, film, and pop culture beyond its scientific basis.


For my ongoing project, Let’s Face Facts: an Information Journal. A brief illustrated history of the High Line Park in New York City.

For my ongoing project, Let’s Face Facts: an Information Journal. A brief illustrated history of the High Line Park in New York City.


Jul 4

RISD Spring 2013 Drawing, Assignment 1: 

The Scroll: 

"Do something, do something to that, and then do something to that."

Jasper Johns

In this assignment, we were instructed to draw skeletons from life on a 2ft x 15ft scroll using any black/white media and a restriction of our choosing (i.e. drawing while blindfolded, drawing with an unusual tool, drawing with one’s feet, etc). After this initial drawing stage, we were instructed to work back into these drawings without restriction in order to clarify forms and ideas. My initial stage was made by dripping a charcoal dust/water mixture over the paper without directing the marks with a brush or drawing implement. The final stage was drawn in compressed and vine charcoal. 


May 30

RISD Foundation Year, Spring Drawing Final: 

The Veil (Artist’s Book): 

This book is a visual response to the personal secrets of 20 anonymous contributors. Each secret was reproduced on a sheet of mylar in the contributor’s own handwriting and veiled by a drawing done with lithographic crayon. I chose to work with lithographic crayon on mylar because drawings can be built up and wiped away; forms emerge intuitively from the process of making, just as we find faces in the clouds. The process of making becomes an act of veiling and unveiling in itself. The book’s content progresses from least personal/intense to most poignant and jarring. Accompanying the book on the pedestal is a glass jar and notebook in which I deconstructed all of the secrets into singular words arranged by parts of speech (nouns, verbs, adjectives, etc). Inside the jar is a piece of paper on which I wrote a series of poems using only the words from the secrets contributed to my project. This deconstruction and recombination of text is another attempt at veiling the highly personal and intimate information I was presented with. 


May 29

RISD Foundation Year, Spring, Drawing Final Series: 

The Veil: 

This body of work consists of over 30 pieces that address physical and psychological constructs of the veil. This work consists of formal studies of the effects of physical veils on vision and perception, the psychological veils we construct for our own thoughts, secrets, and behaviors, and the veils that prevent us from acknowledging the less overt facets of other people. As the work progressed, text became an integral part of the imagery and mark making language. The final part of this series is a hand bound artist’s book containing the secrets of 20 anonymous contributors and accompanying drawings (lithographic crayon on mylar). The book is constructed of translucent mylar, so each image is partially veiled by its predecessor and the viewers’ interactions with the book gradually uncover the content. More details of this book can be found in a secondary post.

This series evolved over a period of 6 weeks. I drew inspiration from a variety of sources including Alberto Giacometti, Jay DeFeo, Christo, Julie Mehretu, Michael Mazur, and Cy Twombly. 


Feb 11

samples of various weaving techniques (twill, pile, tapestry, etc.)


Hand-woven rug inspired by migrating bird flight patterns. 

Dimensions: 3ft x 4ft

Materials: wool and acrylic yarns


In mathematics, two bodies are said to be tangent to one another when they are making contact at a single point or along a line; touching but not intersecting. Human beings, in their relationships with others, sometimes seem to operate on this same principle. We sometimes feel as if we are traveling along the same path as another person, significant or not. We sometimes briefly collide with our fellow travelers only to bounce back in opposite directions, nonetheless impacted by the experience. Tangents attempts to explain chance encounters among people that foster intimate, lasting, but sometimes inexplicable connections. These connections surpass friendship, love, affection, and family ties and seem to come to us through some larger, universal pattern or scheme.Tangents uses quiet, tenuous embroidery to illustrate this mystery of the human condition. 

The book spans 26 pages (only some of which are shown here). 

Dimensions: Book is 5.25 inches x 17.875 feet when unfolded; each page is 5.25 inches x 8.25 inches
Material: Thread and ink on paper
Year: 2012

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